A Werewolf Blog in Brooklyn

Where you’re coming from | December 20, 2009

There is a major misconception with Werewolves.

People, Nons, humans if you will, seem to think we’re either utter monsters carrying some curse around, that makes us loose control over ourselves when we shape-shift, or we’re not much more than common domestic, or wild, dogs.

Werewolves are so much more than this.

First of all, I don’t think I’ve ever heard of anyone ever taming or controlling or teaching tricks to a werewolf.

Who would be stupid enough to try that shit and find out what insulting a supernatural creature is like?

Wait, I’m sure there’s someone out there. But…

Secondly, being a werewolf, isn’t for all of us, or even the majority of us (and there are more than you think) a burden brought on by an ancient curse. First of all, speaking for myself, no curse involved what so ever. None. Nada. Zero. Zip.

Born a werewolf, always a werewolf. Just how it is, how it always will be, it’s what I’ve always known.

I grew up knowing I was a werewolf even before the shape shifting kicked in. Which wasn’t till puberty, like anyone needs that on top of puberty and growing up…but you don’t get a say. Sucks.

I recall asking my father how I could grow up so secure in this knowledge once. He told me, he’d started telling me I was a werewolf and explaining it to me, from when I could talk. Good going Dad.

Of course, when the shape-shifting at puberty stage kicks in, you may feel like any other teenager going through the rigours of growing up. Then the whole thing may begin to feel like some oppressive burden and unwanted curse.

I suspect that’s where Hollywood developed the whole mythos of cursing us with being werewolves from.

I mean you sure as hell don’t feel normal, or confident, well at least, I didn’t. Adjusting to it and how it impacts in your life can be daunting and hard.
But even with the oddity of learning to appreciate and acknowledge this part of me, as I was growing up.

Did I ever compare myself to a dog? Okay maybe once or twice when I was having a severely bad day. Dog Day afternoon you could say, but really, we’re nothing like dogs when we shape-shift.

The average werewolf is about four times the size of a domestic dog. And at least half a metre, to a metre, bigger than regular wild wolves. I’m not sure about the weight ratio, but we’re big fuckers.

Being a big werewolf, is a good thing, it’s all part of the nature of our kind. Big means we’re built for hunting, fighting and intimidation. Big means better survival skills, stronger abilities. You learn this stuff after awhile.

And our “teeth” are more like fangs. Because quite frankly, they’re razor sharp and able to cut through bone. Do you know how tough bone is to get through? It’s hard core. Plus there’s all the heightened senses like scenting, we can track for like, forever, well almost. Night vision and instincts that make us unbelievable hunters.

There is a person in our pack who tracks this kind of information, keeps records on our pack’s lineage with each generation born. Pretty sure there would someone like that in other packs too.

Helps with survival of the pack, to have the information and the history.

To know where you’re coming from and going to.

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1 Comment »

  1. Fascinating. So many things I did not know about the werewolf. I shall lurk a bit longer.

    M.

    Comment by M. — December 21, 2009 @ 12:03 am


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