A Werewolf Blog in Brooklyn

The Werewolf World Cup | July 12, 2010

Tiryakas are without humour, without comprehension of complex emotions, they are beyond the actual things they can do and get rectory response from. Some people believe, they’re repelled by anything unfamiliar. It is believed they are ignorant and complacent, because of their inability to grasp these and other emotions.

Tiryakas come from the animal realm in the Tibetan Book of the dead. And I don’t believe this applies to werewolves.  We can not be called Tiryakas.

Why?

Because of the Fifa World Cup.

Tiryakas Vs Werewolves.

Proof enough.

For starters, our animal realm, is constant within us.  At all times, even when we’re in human form, we still have animal senses, that we use, and abilities, that are…well, beyond the human side of things.  Gifts if you will, from our animal side, from the werewolf.  It’s part of what helps make us, who we are, as well as what we are.

Werewolves.

We exist within and without, human form, tribal form. Skin and fur. We get all of it.  We are used to the unfamiliar, because we’re closer to it, than most people. And it alters on lunar weeks, kicks our balance out if you will, more in favour of the werewolf’s animal form, animal senses, animal habits, animal thinking.

But in our human form, we can understand the animal within.  And we get all the complexity of emotions that come with being werewolves in all to human world.

The Breukelen werewolf pack had  a pack party to watch the Fifa World Cup final.  We were going for the Netherlands.  Even though, another animal, Paul the psychic octopus predicted, accurately, that Spain would win the game.

And when the Netherlands lost, our Pack lost their shit at my brother Markus’s party. A lot of stuff was thrown at the screen we were all watching in united upset.

We felt the loss. We felt our hearts deflate, when Spain scored the only goal in the last minute of the game.  We felt frustrated, every time the Netherlands had opportunity to go for goal and missed. Every time – you should have heard the noise a pack of partying werewolves makes when they “whine”.

We felt the anguish of our team, being so close, and yet missing the victory at the end.  So we, weren’t without thought or understanding of emotions.  But it could be pointed out to me that, maybe we understood these emotions because we were in our human form – and humans feel.  But werewolves do to, especially when in a collective group.  Especially when they’re all decked out, as per the pack party dress code: Orange clothing, watching a sporting event.

Emotions if anything, are even more pronounced when together. In particular in sporting attire, or same blinding, traffic stopping colour.  Also, maybe when there’s alcohol involved too.

The animal realm that the Tiryakas are from is based on fear and ignorance.  Whilst we may suffer from ignorance,  on occasion, perhaps more than likely arrogance, werewolves, do not suffer from fear.

So I don’t think werewolves can be considered Tiryakas as such.  We’re already more evolved than what the Tibetan Book of the dead expects of animals.

We are the liberated animals that have evolved with the humans.  And it is the animal part of us, the werewolf, that helps offer the human side,  the opportunity to be more than it would ever traditionally think to be.

To be, open minded.

Except, about, you know. Losing the World Cup.

Viva Paella for dinner!

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