A Werewolf Blog in Brooklyn

The Art of Shape Shifting | August 2, 2010

Shape shifting, is an artform as much as a natural ability to those of us who have it.  

Because shape shifting, can be a beautiful thing, that amazes and intrigues anyone who watches it and therefore understands it.  Or it can be an ugly, hard, painful and more grotesque form of processed torture if you don’t have control of it, understand it or have factors influencing you as you go through it.

 I should know that later – I’ve had a few bad shape shifts in my time.

So I probably shouldn’t be surprised then, that artist Justin Lowe (Non – at least, pretty sure he’s a non.) has created a new art installation at the Wadsworth Atheneum, that is entitled Werewolf Karoke / Matrix 159 He says the art piece is about, in a sense, shape shifting.  Of course, Justin doesn’t mean to the furry animal kind of shifting.  He’s an artist darling, it would of course, have more perplex and complex, double meanings than something so baser and simple.  He means, about perceptions, that people, have of themselves and others, in various environments. His piece is a recreation of an old defunct nightclub bathroom.

Though it’s nice of him, this werewolf thinks, to link Werewolves and the Matrix together.  I get the perception thing, between the two.  You can be who you are, or you can be who you’re meant to be.  Nice little message of self affirmation.  Who knew art had such self belief? Oh wait, that’s pretty much all art is, self belief.  

And I also think Keanu Reeves, is a very pretty man.  

Love me some Keanu.

Keanu as werewolf, mmmm me love you long time.

I don’t think it’s that surprising that non’s would choose to associate with the idea of shape shifting (whether they be artists or not). 

Humans are forever changing themselves, by appearance, by beliefs and ideals.  It’s done, quite often through out their life spans.  You do it to accommodate people, to be closer to people, to fit in, to stand out, to be noticed, to blend in.  It’s kind of like, Justin Lowe’s Werewolf Karaoke/Matrix concept in a way. It’s about how we appear to other people versus how you want to be seen, really.  It’s about lack of identity and need for culture versus stereotyping a culture and claiming one’s identity through it.  It’s about changing ourselves to better ourselves, to experience our lives in different ways, because, quite frankly, we can.  

Why do the same thing all the time, when you don’t have to?

The shape shifting of perception, or moving some’s mindset, is definitely a human trait, that werewolves take on and incorporate into their daily lives a lot. But for werewolves, the shifting of perceptions thrown onto them, is more of an inbuilt survival need. To protect their true identity, to blend in with their human counterparts and to keep their culture alive, by not endangering it.

Still, now I’m rather intrigued about Justin Lowe’s art piece and think after I watch me some Matrix (the original, the best), sing some Karoke (Hungry like the wolf?  Of wolf and man – anyone?)  I might go check out his art and see what is what.

Advertisements

1 Comment »

  1. […] This post was mentioned on Twitter by Amanojahku, Pierre Novaeu and Pierre Novaeu, Breukelen_girl. Breukelen_girl said: The Art of Shape Shifting: http://wp.me/pyFur-Pp […]

    Pingback by Tweets that mention The Art of Shape Shifting « A Werewolf Blog in Brooklyn -- Topsy.com — August 2, 2010 @ 8:35 am


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

    Arrooo! Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

    Join 463 other followers

    Follow A Werewolf Blog in Brooklyn on WordPress.com

    Search for posts

    Blog Stats

    • 47,906 hits